steak and egg green chile hash

steak egg chile hash 5

Where was this Hatch green chile mania back when I lived on the opposite side of the country from New Mexico? Back then, I had to have my mom send me boxes of fresh green chiles from Albuquerque. She’d pack newspaper in the boxes to help keep the chiles dry, poke holes in the box, and pay out the wazoo for overnight shipping. (Clearly I owe my mom a drink or two.) When they’d arrive, I’d broil them in batches until the skins turned black, then peel, chop, and bag them up. One time I forgot about wearing gloves, resulting in the worst burn I’ve ever had, not from temperature, but from spice.

green chile 2013

But that was years ago. Now I just head down to the local grocery store, buy 2 huge burlap sacks of fresh chiles, and bring it out to the guy roasting them in the parking lot. (Actually, I never do this; it’s become Dave’s errand.) Back at home, Dave and I put on latex gloves and start peeling, seeding, and stemming the chiles. At some point I’ll transition from peeling to chopping and bagging. The whole process takes about 4 hours, and at the end, we have a shelf in the freezer dedicated to our stash.

steak egg chile hash 1

I grew up in Albuquerque, and my family did this when I was a kid, as well. It’s only recently when anyone outside New Mexico could find Hatch green chiles. In fact, the “Hatch” title is a bit of a misnomer – Hatch is a place, not a variety of chile. Green chiles are grown in Hatch, but they’re also grown in the rest of the state. This year, Dave bought our green chiles from a farm in Artesia, so technically they’re not Hatch green chiles at all, but since people seem to recognize Hatch as a type of chile, we’ll stick with that title.

steak egg chile hash 2

Most New Mexicans don’t need a recipe for how to use their green chiles. They just add them to their favorite foods – there’s no Hatch chile macaroni and cheese, there’s just your favorite macaroni and cheese recipe with chiles stirred in. The same goes for cheeseburgers, pizza, grilled cheese sandwiches…are you seeing a pattern? Green chile is really good with carbs and cheese.

steak egg chile hash 3

In this case, we don’t need cheese, just steak, leftover if you have it. Because green chiles are also really good for breakfast – migas and huevos rancheros are my favorite two breakfasts, and now this is up there too. And fortunately, now that “Hatch” green chiles are making their way to almost all corners of the country, you can actually make this for yourself. That is a very good thing.

steak egg chile hash 4

Printer Friendly Recipe
Steak and Egg Green Chile Hash

Serves 4

Depending on how hot your chiles are, you might want to use less (or more) than this.

Photos show a half recipe made in a 9-inch skillet.

12 ounces Yukon gold potatoes, diced into ¼- to ½-inch cubes
2 tablespoons olive or canola oil
salt
1 large onion, diced
8 ounces cooked steak, diced
½ cup Hatch green chiles, roasted, peeled, and chopped
8 eggs
ground black pepper

1. In a medium microwave-safe bowl, combine the potatoes, 1 tablespoon olive oil, and ½ teaspoon salt. Cover and microwave on high for 1 minute. Stir, then return to the microwave for another minute. Stir again, and if the potatoes are not softened to their centers, repeat the microwaving until they are; larger cubes will need more time.

2. In a 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil until it flows like water when the pan is tilted. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent. Add the potatoes and steak and cook, without stirring, until the bottom is lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Stir and cook for another 2 minutes without stirring. Stir in the green chiles. Taste for seasoning and add salt if necessary.

3. Using the back of a spoon, create 8 wells in the hash. Break one egg into each well; season with salt and pepper. Cover the pan and cook, without stirring, until the white is set, about 6 minutes. Serve immediately.

Comments

  1. Stef Mysel says:

    This is so cool! What I love about this recipe is we have a bunch of farmer’s markets that sell fresh eggs and chiles. Going to cook this up over the weekend…thanks Bridget!

  2. pam says:

    I bought some fresh Hatch chiles a few weeks ago, mostly because you made them sound so appealing. I roasted them, peeled and de-seeded them, chopped them, they looked just like your pile up there. And then I tasted one and nearly passed out from the spice. Ha ha!

    (And I live in New Orleans. For shame.)

  3. bridget says:

    pam – Oh no! The spice level varies a lot between different varieties. We always get “Big Jims”, which are mild to medium with the occasional random firey pepper. One year we bought extra-hot; I don’t know what varietal they were, but they were basically inedible because they were so spicy. I like them best when they’re on the mild side, but still have some heat, because then I can add enough to dishes to get a lot of the smoky/sweet/bitter flavor without being overwhelmed by spice.

  4. This is a stunning hash! I would love this.

  5. This looks awesome! Literally as I type this, I’m impatiently waiting on my 10 pound box of hatch chiles to show up on my doorstep. I’ll have to make this one, thanks!

  6. M.E. says:

    If you don’t have access to Hatch chiles (sadness, I know), is there a pepper you’d recommend as a decent substitute?

  7. bridget says:

    M.E. – Try a combination of poblanos and anaheims, plus a jalapeno or chipotle if you want it spicier.

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